Blog, Dentistry

Dentures Causing Weakness

The elderly are at risk of falling, some more than others.

If we start to fall, we need to correct that quickly, which is why it’s important to check your patient’s muscle strength properly, especially the strength of their ECCENTRIC contractions, since these are the ones that are going to prevent them falling.

In this video you can see how I test the strength of an 82 year old lady and find that all of her major muscle groups are weak, how I find the cause in her denture and how she responds to recurring her denture.


Ten days later… the change is still working




 

Monomer is used in the manufacture of some dentures, and while leaching of monomer is small, it sometimes provides enough inhibitory afferent input to affect motor control. Fortunately, this monomer is easily cured and rendered inert with an ultraviolet light, which you can easily find on eBay. I find this needs to be done every 6 months or so if the denture is quite thick (as the monomer diffuses out of the dentures).

Refs:

A long term study on residual monomer release from denture materials.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15232564

Muscle strength rather than muscle mass is associated with standing balance in elderly outpatients.

 

Simon King is the founder of proprioception.org.uk. He teaches health practitioners proprioceptive muscle testing to find and permanently eliminate muscle inhibition by restoring normal afferent input.

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